World Cup 2022

Offcourse as Humans we must not Forget the treatment and possible losses of immigrant workers
and also the biggest scandal in EU, the Qatar gate.

well I fope I will not see Messi again such,


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As also to remember how many times the cup was stollen,
and how this is done?

chamos-me-ton-Salt-Bae-pou-espase-to-protokollo-kai-pire-sta-cheria-tou-to-tropaio-tou-mountial-160.jpg
 
Oh please, again with the Conspiracy Theories everywhere you turn. Give it a rest.
 
Some of the old t-rolling is still surfacing in the commentary, as in "Well, the Argentines love him now, but they used to call him a traitor".

What is apparent to me is the loyalty these highly skilled and sought-after men have to the country of their birth. Angel di Maria, of 100% Italian ancestry, also has Italian citizenship. The same is true for Tagliafico. Messi, about 75% Italian and 25% Catalan, could have played for either country. I just read yesterday that Diego Maradonna was half Calabrian, so the same was true for him. Then there's MacAllister, Irish and Italian.

Yet they all have one thing in common. They all play for the Argentina national side.

Sometimes I think that Europeans can only see things through a European lens, People born in the Americas are "Americans". The old ties are just that, "old ties", respected perhaps, but not where the primary loyalty lies.


interesting angela
seems all the great players had some italian heritage ;)
speaking of france
here the great platini ( he is 100% north italian by heritage)
from wikipedia :
Born in Jœuf, in the Lorraine region, Platini is the son of Aldo and Anna (née Piccinelli), both of Italian ancestry. Anna's family has its roots in the province of Belluno, while Aldo's father, Francesco Platini, was an immigrant from Agrate Conturbia, in the province of Novara, and settled in France shortly after the end of the First World War.[9]

Michel-Platini.jpg


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I wouldn't go that far. Emiliano Martinez, Julian Alvarez, Enzo Fernandez, Rodrigo De Paul, Gonzalo Montiel, Nahuel Molina, Nicola Otamendi, all are great players on an international level and did their country proud, and the only Italian surnames I see are Molina and De Paul, although the mothers' surnames aren't listed.

60% plus of Argentines are of full or partial Italian ancestry, not 100%.

Anyway, as I said, they're Argentines.
 
I wouldn't go that far. Emiliano Martinez, Julian Alvarez, Enzo Fernandez, Rodrigo De Paul, Gonzalo Montiel, Nahuel Molina, Nicola Otamendi, all are great players on an international level and did their country proud, and the only Italian surnames I see are Molina and De Paul, although the mothers' surnames aren't listed.

60% plus of Argentines are of full or partial Italian ancestry, not 100%.

Anyway, as I said, they're Argentines.


they could have italian heritage by there mother side
but anyway you got a point i gone to far
cruyff,pele,beckenbauer all had 0% italian heritage and they were great football players
 
they could have italian heritage by there mother side
but anyway you got a point i gone to far
cruyff,pele,beckenbauer all had 0% italian heritage and they were great football players

[FONT=&quot]Eusébio :)[/FONT]
 
Captains of the Brazilian National Teams of 1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002.

8QGglW8.jpg

The captains of 1958 and 1994 also had some Italian blood.

Bellini (Hilderaldo Luís Bellini), 1958: He was the son of Erminio Bellini, an Italian immigrant from Comacchio (Ferrara), and Carolina Levati, Brazilian, daughter of Italians.

Dunga (Carlos Caetano Bledorn Verri), 2002: Dunga has German and Italian ancestry.

The others not.
 
interesting angela
seems all the great players had some italian heritage ;)
speaking of france
here the great platini ( he is 100% north italian by heritage)
from wikipedia :
Born in Jœuf, in the Lorraine region, Platini is the son of Aldo and Anna (née Piccinelli), both of Italian ancestry. Anna's family has its roots in the province of Belluno, while Aldo's father, Francesco Platini, was an immigrant from Agrate Conturbia, in the province of Novara, and settled in France shortly after the end of the First World War.[9]

Michel-Platini.jpg


pixel.gif

he had a choice to play with either nation ........France or Italy ................if you win the cup , then it was the correct choice
 
Even on the current French team, Giroud is half-Italian. More than 5 million French citizens are of full or part Italian ancestry. That's why I go to southern France every time I'm in Italy; I have family there.

As for the Argentina team, in the past there was Maradona, Di Stefano, Passarella, Gabriel Batistuta, Nestor Rossi and Oscar Ruggeri. It's just a function of Italian migration and the fact that in countries like France, Argentina, Brazil, they were eventually completely accepted, and so completely assimilated. It's not the same in every country.

Oh, I'm sure the Argentine Pope, a devoted soccer fan, and of 100% Italian ancestry, was cheering on the Argentine national team.
 
Even on the current French team, Giroud is half-Italian. More than 5 million French citizens are of full or part Italian ancestry. That's why I go to southern France every time I'm in Italy; I have family there.

As for the Argentina team, in the past there was Maradona, Di Stefano, Passarella, Gabriel Batistuta, Nestor Rossi and Oscar Ruggeri. It's just a function of Italian migration and the fact that in countries like France, Argentina, Brazil, they were eventually completely accepted, and so completely assimilated. It's not the same in every country.

Oh, I'm sure the Argentine Pope, a devoted soccer fan, and of 100% Italian ancestry, was cheering on the Argentine national team.

I think that the combination of their Italian genes with a new/free homeland brought out the best in them. And yes, the vibe of Argentinians and Brazilians always electrified me. I worked in the tourism industry for a few years and was always amazed with the vibe guests from Argentina and Brazil brought with them.
 
I think that the combination of their Italian genes with a new/free homeland brought out the best in them. And yes, the vibe of Argentinians and Brazilians always electrified me. I worked in the tourism industry for a few years and was always amazed with the vibe guests from Argentina and Brazil brought with them.

Not a bad theory.

The Italians, mostly from the South, were able to thrive and become more successful than many other well-established groups in the Untied States.

Though that may be because the most entrepreneurial, and individualistic South Italians left the South for greener pastures. Which in turn depletes the vitality of the region.

 
Italians were "sold" to go to other countries

22Million in 1861

add 5M Lombards in 1865
add 4M Veneti and Friuli in 1870

the italian government could not even feed the initial 22M

"sold" italian to Belgium for Coal

Italians provided with a “free” ticket in exchange for “free” work which turned out to be uncovered slavery. The Italian government had to issue the Prinetti decree to stop Italians from immigrating to Brazil.

provide cheap labour for coffee growers in Brazil

According to the Italian embassy in Brazil (2013), there are over 30 million people with Italian ancestry in Brazil, half of those live in the state of São Paulo.

 
Even on the current French team, Giroud is half-Italian. More than 5 million French citizens are of full or part Italian ancestry. That's why I go to southern France every time I'm in Italy; I have family there.

As for the Argentina team, in the past there was Maradona, Di Stefano, Passarella, Gabriel Batistuta, Nestor Rossi and Oscar Ruggeri. It's just a function of Italian migration and the fact that in countries like France, Argentina, Brazil, they were eventually completely accepted, and so completely assimilated. It's not the same in every country.

Oh, I'm sure the Argentine Pope, a devoted soccer fan, and of 100% Italian ancestry, was cheering on the Argentine national team.

The assimilation of Italian immigrants was certainly so intense in the Southeast region of Brazil that you are often surprised by situations that happened within your own family or in your neighborhood. Ulisses G Duarte is my uncle and also my father's brother. My aunt, S G Duarte, his widow, is now 90 years old. I regularly go to aunt S's house, just as I regularly visit her children's house that is, obviously, the house of my cousins, who also sign G Duarte, just as my father signed, my mother also signed, my paternal grandparents signed, my paternal great-grandparents also signed, and so on. My mother also signed my Dad's 'G Duarte', but kept the 'P' from her father, my maternal grandfather (when married, she adopted my father's full surname, also keeping the 'P' surname from her father, my maternal grandfather, who would become my godfather at baptism as a special deference to my father for maintaining, in his grandson, the lineage of his surname 'P', typically Portuguese, and my father even agreed with the deletion of the G, so that I not have an extremely long name. I sign P Duarte and not G Duarte. My first name is a compound name). My maternal grandfather had only two daughters and adopted a son, my adoptive uncle who already had a baptismal name when he was adopted by my maternal grandparents. My mother is P G Duarte, I am P Duarte, my middle brother, like me, is P Duarte and my younger sister, like my mother, is P G Duarte. My middle brother has a compound first name just like me. My sister has a simple first name. I also have a foster brother, but he was already there at home when I was born. He is the son of a my father's brother who died in a car accident with his wife and my father and mother took care of the boy. For a change, he also signs G Duarte. Continuing the story I intend to tell: I met N Lorenzatto when I was 23 years old. I had just joined to the auditor career, that is my current job until today. N Lorenzatto, an experienced auditor, was assigned to train me. For me it was a professional relationship. I was just a young man at the beginning of his career who would later become Lorenzatto's boss. Him: middle age, gray hair, very blue eyes, pink skin, medium height, not much different from the other thousands of descendants of immigrants from Veneto who live in BH. One day Lorenzatto asks me: What is your father's name? I reply: His first name is F, like me. And what was your father's last name, he asks again. I answered: G Duarte. I don't have my father's 'G'. The 'G' has been suppressed by the 'P' which comes from my maternal grandfather. Then he surprises me by saying: I'm your dear Aunt S's brother. I answer him: It is! I don't know any Lorenzatto in my family and that's not Aunt S's last name. He answers me: Your Aunt S's maiden name is S Lorenzatto and he adds: You were luckier to inherit your grandfather's maternal surname. My sister dropped my father's surname when she married your uncle and so, my nieces carry only their father's family surname, Ulisses, your uncle. Well, the rest is history.

There are other surprising cases involving me and the Lorenzattos, but family stories are too big and I'm too lazy to write them, lol.

Just one more point about the complete assimilation of Italians in southeastern Brazil. It is the story of another coworker, my age or a little older than me, who lives in the neighborhood where I was born in BH, who fanatically supports the same football team that I support, who speaks Portuguese with typical accent of those who were born and raised in this neighborhood and which is considered the typical accent of BH (my case) and with which I always maintained a great relationship and he and I always admired each other's work. I always thought that he was my countryman, the son of Italian immigrants and I only found out that he was an Italian born in Turin when I had access to his functional file on a occasion when I took over a manager and was surveying the professional experience of those who would work with me. It is true that I always found it strange that his parents did not translate his first name into Portuguese. His baptism first name is Alessandro Giuseppe. Then I saw that the name could not be translated into Portuguese since he was born there. Living and learning!
 
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The assimilation of Italian immigrants was certainly so intense in the Southeast region of Brazil that you are often surprised by situations that happened within your own family or in your neighborhood. Ulisses G Duarte is my uncle and also my father's brother. My aunt, S G Duarte, his widow, is now 90 years old. I regularly go to aunt S's house, just as I regularly visit her children's house that is, obviously, the house of my cousins, who also sign G Duarte, just as my father signed, my mother also signed, my paternal grandparents signed, my paternal great-grandparents also signed, and so on. My mother also signed my Dad's 'G Duarte', but kept the 'P' from her father, my maternal grandfather (when married, she adopted my father's full surname, also keeping the 'P' surname from her father, my maternal grandfather, who would become my godfather at baptism as a special deference to my father for maintaining, in his grandson, the lineage of his surname 'P', typically Portuguese, and my father even agreed with the deletion of the G, so that I would not have an extremely long name. I sign P Duarte and not G Duarte. My first name is a compound name). My maternal grandfather had only two daughters and adopted a son, my adoptive uncle who already had a baptismal name when he was adopted by my maternal grandparents. My mother is P G Duarte, I am P Duarte, my middle brother, like me, is P Duarte and my younger sister, like my mother, is P G Duarte. My middle brother has a compound first name just like me. My sister has a simple first name. I also have a foster brother, but he was already there at home when I was born. He is the son of a father's brother who died in a car accident with his wife and my father and mother took care of the boy. For a change, he also signs G Duarte. Continuing the story I intend to tell: I met N Lorenzatto when I was 23 years old. I had just joined to the auditor career, that is my current job until today. N Lorenzatto, an experienced auditor, was assigned to train me. For me it was a professional relationship. I was just a young man at the beginning of his career who would later become Lorenzatto's boss. Him: middle age, gray hair, very blue eyes, pink skin, medium height, not much different from the other thousands of descendants of immigrants from Veneto who live in BH. One day Lorenzatto asks me: What is your father's name? I reply: His first name is F, like me. And what was your father's last name, he asks again. I answered: G Duarte. I don't have my father's 'G'. The 'G' has been suppressed by the 'P' which comes from my maternal grandfather. Then he surprises me by saying: I'm your dear Aunt S's brother. I answer him: It is! I don't know any Lorenzatto in my family and that's not Aunt S's last name. He answers me: Your Aunt S's maiden name is S Lorenzatto and he adds: You were luckier to inherit your grandfather's maternal surname. My sister dropped my father's surname when she married your uncle and so, my nieces carry only their father's family surname, Ulisses, your uncle. Well, the rest is history.
There are other surprising cases involving me and the Lorenzattos, but family stories are too big and I'm too lazy to write them, lol.
Just one more point about the complete assimilation of Italians in southeastern Brazil. It is the story of another coworker, my age or a little older than me, who lives in the neighborhood where I was born in BH, who fanatically supports the same football team that I support, who speaks Portuguese with typical accent of those who were born and raised in this neighborhood and which is considered the typical accent of BH (my case) and with which I always maintained a great relationship and he and I always admired each other's work. I always thought that he was my countryman, the son of Italian immigrants and I only found out that he was an Italian born in Turin when I had access to his functional file on a occasion when I took over a manager and was surveying the professional experience of those who would work with me. It is true that I always found it strange that his parents did not translate his first name into Portuguese. His baptism first name is Alessandro Giuseppe. Then I saw that the name could not be translated into Portuguese since he was born there. Living and learning!
IF your origins are north Italian...then most likely you are lombard
https://www.cognomix.it/mappe-dei-cognomi-italiani/DUARTE
 

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