Intelligence What characterises people with high IQ's ?

Really ? I am impatient but I don't consider myself a high IQ genius. I think there are other or more important traits besides IQ.

What do you think about genes for creativity and other things like motor skills, memory ?

That is entering the roam of intuition:
https://www.rhesusnegative.net/stay...neration-and-evaluation-stages-of-creativity/The Role of Intuition in the Generation and Evaluation Stages of Creativity

Our review showed that intuition is associated with both the idea generation and the idea evaluation phases of the creative problem-solving process. Data was pooled together to obtain a more fine-grained picture about where and how intuitive processes are linked with specific stages of creative problem solving. It was found that previous studies connected intuition chiefly to the idea generation phase. Two possible pathways were sketched out explaining the use of intuition in response to ill-defined problems. Finally, intuition, despite being increasingly investigated in psychological research, is still interpreted in a broad, vague manner, and we suggest future empirical research should be directed to test specific hypotheses such as those offered here or by Sadler-Smith (2015) in order to reveal its underlying working mechanisms in creative problem solving.


 
Really ? I am impatient but I don't consider myself a high IQ genius. I think there are other or more important traits besides IQ.

What do you think about genes for creativity and other things like motor skills, memory ?

A test for memory is part of any well administered and recognized IQ test.

If by creativity you mean painting, writing etc., you need a certain I.Q., but certainly nothing above 125 or so.

Motor skills have nothing to do with IQ. You can lose most of them, as with Harding, and your IQ is still intact.

Maybe I'd add a certain arrogance to lack of patience. I'm not saying all high IQ people have those traits, nor that people with average IQs might not have them, I'm just saying that having to explain over and over again what is so simple to oneself to people who just don't get and never will it can make one very impatient.
 
A test for memory is part of any well administered and recognized IQ test.

If by creativity you mean painting, writing etc., you need a certain I.Q., but certainly nothing above 125 or so.

Motor skills have nothing to do with IQ. You can lose most of them, as with Harding, and your IQ is still intact.

Maybe I'd add a certain arrogance to lack of patience. I'm not saying all high IQ people have those traits, nor that people with average IQs might not have them, I'm just saying that having to explain over and over again what is so simple to oneself to people who just don't get and never will it can make one very impatient.

Wouldn't someone of high intelligence be able to recognize their own emotional patterns, what provokes them and control their own emotions and try to look at things on the brighter side though ? Some people I know who were school smart got scammed online and I knew it was a scam. I even told him it is a scam but he didn't listen.

Didn't neccessarily say those traits I mentioned have anything to do with IQ, but I don't see how that MENSA test tests for all these abilities. It is mainly about figuring out patterns. Therefor as you said: maybe online tests are useless.

Some people are also naturally gifted people, such as in sports for example, or some sort of skill where it also requires to be creative. Some people are gifted at maths or some sort of engineering. One should surround themselves with people one can learn from. It's also about hard work, having patience and not giving up, i.e being resilient. Even if you are not a super gifted person. One should also surround themselves with positive people and uplift others. This is where I have made mistakes obviously, because I seek negativity and drama.
 
Wouldn't someone of high intelligence be able to recognize their own emotional patterns, what provokes them and control their own emotions and try to look at things on the brighter side though ? Some people I know who were school smart got scammed online and I knew it was a scam. I even told him it is a scam but he didn't listen.

Didn't neccessarily say those traits I mentioned have anything to do with IQ, but I don't see how that MENSA test tests for all these abilities. It is mainly about figuring out patterns. Therefor as you said: maybe online tests are useless.

Some people are also naturally gifted people, such as in sports for example, or some sort of skill where it also requires to be creative. Some people are gifted at maths or some sort of engineering. One should surround themselves with people one can learn from. It's also about hard work, having patience and not giving up, i.e being resilient. Even if you are not a super gifted person. One should also surround themselves with positive people and uplift others. This is where I have made mistakes obviously, because I seek negativity and drama.

There is no proven association between wisdom and intelligence.
Maybe someone should create a WQ?
I have been hearing about how inaccurate IQ tests supposedly are for the past 40 years, but I have yet to see someone propose something better...
 
There is no proven association between wisdom and intelligence.
Maybe someone should create a WQ?
I have been hearing about how inaccurate IQ tests supposedly are for the past 40 years, but I have yet to see someone propose something better...



Curious though, what do you define as intelligence ? (I am not arguing against you or anything)

the ability to understand and learn well, and to form judgments and opinions based on reason

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence

Intelligence has been defined in many ways: the capacity for abstraction, logic, understanding, self-awareness, learning, emotional knowledge, reasoning, planning, creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving. More generally, it can be described as the ability to perceive or infer information, and to retain it as knowledge to be applied towards adaptive behaviors within an environment or context.


What do you think about emotional intelligence ?
 
Emotional intelligence (EI) is most often defined as the ability to perceive, use, understand, manage, and handle emotions. People with high emotional intelligence can recognize their own emotions and those of others, use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, discern between different feelings and label them appropriately, and adjust emotions to adapt to environments.[1] Although the term first appeared in 1964,[2] it gained popularity in the 1995 best-selling book Emotional Intelligence, written by science journalist Daniel Goleman. Goleman defined EI as the array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance.[3]
Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to perceive, control, and evaluate emotions. Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can be learned and strengthened, while others claim it is an inborn characteristic

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence
 

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/lim2.11
 
In the past, I have posted a study related to IQ and blood types on my Facebook group and it was raining comments with elevated IQ scores.
Then I posted this link: https://www.mensa.org/public/mensa-iq-challenge
and asked for screenshots...
complete silence!

Funnily enough I remember taking that some years ago when I was bored. Think the result part just suggested to me to take the real Mensa test, as this was just to see if It's even worth attempting. IIRC the time constraint was the real challenge, as when one sees the questions for the first time it can throw one off.

On a side note, I remember taking some similar, albeit less renowned test, with a bit more interesting questions, and I was average in a lot of aspects, "recall"/short term memory being one of those. But I was at the extremes of the bell curve in "abstract thinking" (the one where you have to rotate various shaped objects in your head to find the answer). Again time constraint was the main factor I think.

As a final note, I think given a starting predisposition, one could train for such tests, as the "being thrown off" by time constraints, or interesting type of questions, can be prepared for, and even pattern recognition in the problem solving itself is more than possible.

What are common things with high IQ people? Some of the stuff I have read and heard(Huberman podcast IIRC, but from what I see the research is contradictory/nonconclusive) is that above 135IQ there is a higher prevalence of mental illness such BPD, BD etc. And above 150 there is a stark increase in suicide rates. Not all that glitters is gold.

One large study led by Ruth Karpinski of Pitzer College surveyed more than 3,700 members of Mensa, a society whose members must have an IQ in the top two percent, which is typically about 132 or higher. The team asked about many factors, including mental health. They discovered that mood disorders and anxiety disorders were extremely common among Mensa members.Among the general population, about 10 percent of people have mood disorders and about 10 percent of people have some anxiety disorder, with some degree of overlap between the two. Among Mensa members, those percentages were much higher.
About 20 percent reported having been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and nearly 27 percent had been diagnosed with a mood disorder such as major depression or bipolar disorder. [See ‘High intelligence: A risk factor for psychological and physiological overexcitabilities for more details about the study.]
 
Funnily enough I remember taking that some years ago when I was bored. Think the result part just suggested to me to take the real Mensa test, as this was just to see if It's even worth attempting. IIRC the time constraint was the real challenge, as when one sees the questions for the first time it can throw one off.

On a side note, I remember taking some similar, albeit less renowned test, with a bit more interesting questions, and I was average in a lot of aspects, "recall"/short term memory being one of those. But I was at the extremes of the bell curve in "abstract thinking" (the one where you have to rotate various shaped objects in your head to find the answer). Again time constraint was the main factor I think.

As a final note, I think given a starting predisposition, one could train for such tests, as the "being thrown off" by time constraints, or interesting type of questions, can be prepared for, and even pattern recognition in the problem solving itself is more than possible.

What are common things with high IQ people? Some of the stuff I have read and heard(Huberman podcast IIRC, but from what I see the research is contradictory/nonconclusive) is that above 135IQ there is a higher prevalence of mental illness such BPD, BD etc. And above 150 there is a stark increase in suicide rates. Not all that glitters is gold.

That doesn't surprise me
 
Realizing modern IQ tests aren't a true measure of intelligence. Reality will always give us the best IQ test there is.
 
Realizing modern IQ tests aren't a true measure of intelligence. Reality will always give us the best IQ test there is.

That depends on your "reality" and whether or not analytic abilities are required of you.
 

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