Question Smoking poll, do you smoke?

Please answer the options honestly :) .

  • I smoke a lot i.e. 5 or more average every day or almost every day.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • I smoke regularly, but not much i.e. 5 or less average every day or almost every day.

    Votes: 3 4.2%
  • I smoke occasionally i.e. a couple of times a week or less.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • I smoke rarely or only a couple of times in my life.

    Votes: 5 6.9%
  • I smoke, but have been smoking more recently.

    Votes: 2 2.8%
  • I smoke, but have no idea of when or intentions of giving up yet.

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • I smoke, but have plans/intentions of giving it up at some point.

    Votes: 3 4.2%
  • I smoke, but have been cutting down recently.

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • I smoke, but I am trying to quit the habit currently.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I smoke, but have given up the habit or taken breaks from it in the past.

    Votes: 3 4.2%
  • I used to smoke but have quit the habit.

    Votes: 10 13.9%
  • I don?ft smoke, but have considered taking up the habit in the past.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I don?ft smoke and have never considered taking it up.

    Votes: 30 41.7%
  • I don?ft smoke, but quite a few of my friends or family do.

    Votes: 9 12.5%
  • I don?ft smoke and very few or none of my friends or family do.

    Votes: 19 26.4%
  • I?fve smoked before in places where I shouldn?ft have.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • I?fve always smoked in places where it was allowed.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • I?fve smoked underage before.

    Votes: 16 22.2%
  • I?fve smoked an illegal substance before in the past.

    Votes: 19 26.4%
  • Other?c

    Votes: 3 4.2%

  • Total voters
    72
*11 year thread necromancy* :kaioken:

It's very hard to fully quit smoking. I usually fall in and out of it. The problem is I never should have started in the first place. As I probably have a predisposition to liking nicotine. I can quit for long stretches of time. Nevertheless, if I go out for a few drinks with friends, I may sometimes buy a pack or "loosies" (single cigarettes). I currently have a pack that I regret buying. Perhaps its the inhibition from the alcohol that lures me to it. My GP told me that once the brain gets hooked on it, its impossible to stop the urges; but you must resist.

Nicotine is one of the most addictive substances you can do; ranked 3rd in the world. If you haven't done it, don't start.

Nevertheless, I can go several months without smoking, at a time. If I do, it's usually just a short day or two flirtation with it.

I smoked for a couple of months when I was around 20 and at university. I honestly didn't get much out of it, and I hated the way my fingers looked yellow and the ashes all over the place. (I'm a clean fanatic in terms of my living and working space.) I just decided to stop and never had any desire to do it again.

I must have my mother's genes where nicotine is concerned. My father was addicted to it virtually his whole life, from around 12, he said, until it killed him in his mid-70s, which was way too young in a family where they were very long lived. However, considering that when young he smoked Italian and Egyptian cigarettes, and then later sometimes two packs a day of Lucky Strikes, and after that cigars and pipe tobacco (and inhaled it all), it's a tribute to his immune system that it didn't get him earlier. He struggled so mightily with it, tried the nicotine gum, etc., but nothing worked. He was just miserable without it.

Now I have to watch my son struggle with it. I told him over and over again not to start, but he did, and he is well and truly addicted. He switched to the e-cigaretees and now to the vape, which I hope is better. I worry about it all the time.

Yet, perhaps because I smelled it for some many years, and smelled it on my father for so many years, especially pipe tobacco, the smell of it is far from unpleasant. After my father died, a friend of his came to see me early one morning to commiserate on our loss. It was winter and he had just come in from cutting wood, and he gave me a deep hug. The smell of the fresh, cold air, the wood, and the pipe tobacco which he also smoked, with the feel of his bristly, pre-shave cheek next to mine hit me like a thunderbolt, and I felt a sense of loss so profound that I burst into tears and my knees almost buckled. Even today, years later and as horrible as it is, the smell of tobacco, especially pipe tobacco, reminds me of my father, and so it ironically makes me feel safe and loved. Human beings are such strange creatures, or at least I am, I guess.
 
Having witnessed horror vids back in grade school about lung disease caused by cigarette smoking, infomercials showing people strapped to an oxygen tank the rest of their lives, and someone who used to smoke who spent far too long catching his breath after walking up a staircase due to his abysmally poor physical fitness (he's clean now!), I have no desire.

I would be happy to turn back time and stop myself from grabbing the booze bottle, especially since I had a weak liver even before then. I'm not an alcoholic, but I drink recreationally and I would be super happy if I could find a substitute.
 
I smoked for a couple of months when I was around 20 and at university. I honestly didn't get much out of it, and I hated the way my fingers looked yellow and the ashes all over the place. (I'm a clean fanatic in terms of my living and working space.) I just decided to stop and never had any desire to do it again.
I must have my mother's genes where nicotine is concerned. My father was addicted to it virtually his whole life, from around 12, he said, until it killed him in his mid-70s, which was way too young in a family where they were very long lived. However, considering that when young he smoked Italian and Egyptian cigarettes, and then later sometimes two packs a day of Lucky Strikes, and after that cigars and pipe tobacco (and inhaled it all), it's a tribute to his immune system that it didn't get him earlier. He struggled so mightily with it, tried the nicotine gum, etc., but nothing worked. He was just miserable without it.
Now I have to watch my son struggle with it. I told him over and over again not to start, but he did, and he is well and truly addicted. He switched to the e-cigaretees and now to the vape, which I hope is better. I worry about it all the time.
Yet, perhaps because I smelled it for some many years, and smelled it on my father for so many years, especially pipe tobacco, the smell of it is far from unpleasant. After my father died, a friend of his came to see me early one morning to commiserate on our loss. It was winter and he had just come in from cutting wood, and he gave me a deep hug. The smell of the fresh, cold air, the wood, and the pipe tobacco which he also smoked, with the feel of his bristly, pre-shave cheek next to mine hit me like a thunderbolt, and I felt a sense of loss so profound that I burst into tears and my knees almost buckled. Even today, years later and as horrible as it is, the smell of tobacco, especially pipe tobacco, reminds me of my father, and so it ironically makes me feel safe and loved. Human beings are such strange creatures, or at least I am, I guess.

My dad still smokes cigarettes, and he's been smoking since he was 9 years old; he's 60 now. I don't think he's ever going to quit : (

I must have his genes in that regard.

My mom smoked too for a few years, but was able to quit cold turkey and never went back to it after decades.

But I know what you mean about the smell of tobacco and linking it to your dad. When I smell my hand after having a cigarette I instantly think of my parents.

I don't know how good vaping is for you, but perhaps your son should try something else like chewing gum. Honestly, I think the biggest part of addiction to cigarettes is really the act of smoking itself. Because after a few puffs, I usually feel disgusted by it. It's more of the habit of doing it, than the satisfaction you get from it I think. Filling the gap of boredom is what drove me to do it sometimes. Perhaps tell him to replace it with some other type of ritualistic act like, making tea. That helped me sometimes.
 
Now I have to watch my son struggle with it. I told him over and over again not to start, but he did, and he is well and truly addicted. He switched to the e-cigaretees and now to the vape, which I hope is better. I worry about it all the time.
Has he tried the gum, patches, or the pills?
 
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Oh no, never (y) Smoking is poisonous and why "burn" money? :useless:

Yes I tried, as most teenagers of my friends did at that time, but if I suck the smoke into my lungs, I felt unwell and dizzy.
 
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I’m not the one who’s gonna deny that smoking hurts, but sometimes it makes you feel better (in the soul). I am lucky because I don't like cigarettes - this is a very compulsive style of smoking - but I love cigars and, above all, pipes, the so-called "slow smoking". You should not inhale, but you taste it in your mouth and nose, and especially it doesn't create addiction
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I’m not the one who’s gonna deny that smoking hurts, but sometimes it makes you feel better (in the soul). I am lucky because I don't like cigarettes - this is a very compulsive style of smoking - but I love cigars and, above all, pipes, the so-called "slow smoking". You should not inhale, but you taste it in your mouth and nose, and especially it doesn't create addiction
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You look like you could be one of my cousins. :)

My Dad smoked pipes in the latter part of his life. Unfortunately he inhaled even that.

The smell, particularly of cigars (which he also smoked), and pipe tobacco, is so entwined with my love for him and my memories of him that to this day I find it an attractive and even comforting smell on a man.

I don't know if I told the story on this thread, but shortly after my father died a dear friend of the family dropped in at my parents' house to see how I was doing. He was about my father's age, smoked a pipe, like my dad, hadn't shaved so he was a little bristly, and had been out in the cold air cutting firewood, which my dad did all the time. When he hugged me close I felt a jolt of remembrance and love, and just broke down crying. So embarrassing. :(

Smell is a powerful conveyor of emotion.

I never took to it myself, although while at university I smoked for a few months. From what my dad said the nicotine both calms and focuses, so I can well understand why some people really like it.

It just never had much effect on me, other than to make me a little hyper-focused, which I definitely didn't need. It's like caffeine that way. I just can't handle very much of it.
 
You look like you could be one of my cousins. :)

My Dad smoked pipes in the latter part of his life. Unfortunately he inhaled even that.

The smell, particularly of cigars (which he also smoked), and pipe tobacco, is so entwined with my love for him and my memories of him that to this day I find it an attractive and even comforting smell on a man.

I don't know if I told the story on this thread, but shortly after my father died a dear friend of the family dropped in at my parents' house to see how I was doing. He was about my father's age, smoked a pipe, like my dad, hadn't shaved so he was a little bristly, and had been out in the cold air cutting firewood, which my dad did all the time. When he hugged me close I felt a jolt of remembrance and love, and just broke down crying. So embarrassing. :(

Smell is a powerful conveyor of emotion.

I never took to it myself, although while at university I smoked for a few months. From what my dad said the nicotine both calms and focuses, so I can well understand why some people really like it.

It just never had much effect on me, other than to make me a little hyper-focused, which I definitely didn't need. It's like caffeine that way. I just can't handle very much of it.

Human olfactory abilities are stronger than we want to admit, and I believe that this is even more important for women
http://www.lescienze.it/news/2017/05/12/news/confronto_olfatto_umano_animali-3524999/

Surely this habit of smoking - more or less relaxing - is as old as the world, since even in his Histories - IV book Herodotus spoke of the Scythians burning hemp seeds to get high.
And Mr. Bach also wrote an air inspired by the pipe and its smoke ;)

 
Human olfactory abilities are stronger than we want to admit, and I believe that this is even more important for women
http://www.lescienze.it/news/2017/05/12/news/confronto_olfatto_umano_animali-3524999/

Surely this habit of smoking - more or less relaxing - is as old as the world, since even in his Histories - IV book Herodotus spoke of the Scythians burning hemp seeds to get high.
And Mr. Bach also wrote an air inspired by the pipe and its smoke ;)


Interesting. So maybe this ancient "ability" isn't extinct. I like that they used the ability to smell different "notes" in wine as an example. :)

I've mentioned once, I think, that I could swear that I remember my mother's scent: it was like delicate flowers. I always thought of it as the scent of "goodness". :) I lay on her bed with her when she died and just tried to breathe it in.

I think perhaps that's connected to why dogs and cats seem to hate certain people (and other animals) and love others on what looks like first "sight" but is probably on smell.

Who knows, maybe that has something to do with "love at first sight" with humans as well.

One of the most affecting scenes I've seen in film, one that has been shamelessly copied by other directors, is the scene in "Z" by Costa Gravas where the widow, played by Irene Papas, stands in the closet she shared with her husband, smelling his shirt, and becomes hysterical with grief. That expressive, gorgeous face of hers just crumbled. I totally "got" it.


Ah, my beloved Bach. Yes, what a testimony to the seductive appeal of tobacco. :)
 
Interesting. So maybe this ancient "ability" isn't extinct. I like that they used the ability to smell different "notes" in wine as an example. :)

I've mentioned once, I think, that I could swear that I remember my mother's scent: it was like delicate flowers. I always thought of it as the scent of "goodness". :) I lay on her bed with her when she died and just tried to breathe it in.

I think perhaps that's connected to why dogs and cats seem to hate certain people (and other animals) and love others on what looks like first "sight" but is probably on smell.

Who knows, maybe that has something to do with "love at first sight" with humans as well.


Correct: the so-called "chemistry" :)
 
I'm on break enjoying one now, so here goes:


I work pizza, which means that there's a lot of hectic time and a lot of downtime. When I decide to go for a smoke, I'm always struck by the same thought. Since I'm not allowed to smoke inside anymore, the very act of my segregation from everyone else means that I'm choosing to dedicate the next five minutes of my life exclusively to pleasure.


There's no distraction from a cigarette. There's nothing else than you can do while you smoke. You're outside getting a little fresh air and a little ******-up air, and the thing in your hand is a timer that tells you how long you have left to do absolutely nothing but enjoy yourself. There's something lovely about that.


Sure, it's time off my life. Sure, I have a "plan" to quit that probably won't play out how I expect. But for five minutes at a time, I'm completely dedicated to relaxation and I am not allowed, by law, to do anything else.


It's peaceful. It's calming. It's quiet and simple. And that's why I smoke.
 
Yes, I've started quite late, when I was 21 years old, now I'm 34

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I'm on break enjoying one now, so here goes:


I work pizza, which means that there's a lot of hectic time and a lot of downtime. When I decide to go for a smoke, I'm always struck by the same thought. Since I'm not allowed to smoke inside anymore, the very act of my segregation from everyone else means that I'm choosing to dedicate the next five minutes of my life exclusively to pleasure.


There's no distraction from a cigarette. There's nothing else than you can do while you smoke. You're outside getting a little fresh air and a little ******-up air, and the thing in your hand is a timer that tells you how long you have left to do absolutely nothing but enjoy yourself. There's something lovely about that.


Sure, it's time off my life. Sure, I have a "plan" to quit that probably won't play out how I expect. But for five minutes at a time, I'm completely dedicated to relaxation and I am not allowed, by law, to do anything else.


It's peaceful. It's calming. It's quiet and simple. And that's why I smoke.

And it will kill you. I saw my father die of small scale lung cancer. You don't want that to happen to you. Why not try to live your life so it goes on into a ripe, very old age.
 
I once asked a guy this very question and he replied “ only in bed”
That is a great pickup line!
 
I have never smoked and do not understand smokers. The smell of smoke makes me feel bad
 

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