List of cheeses invented over 300 years ago

Maciamo

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I recently finished reading Alberto Angela's I tre giorni di Pompei (The [last] three days of Pompeii), in which he mentions that mozzarella didn't exist at the time, but was invented in the 5th century, at the end of the Roman empire. Wikipedia disagrees and says that the earliest buffalo milk cheese in southern Italy dates from the 12th century and that the name Mozzarella doesn't appear until the 16th century. That made me wonder how old various types of European cheese actually were. So here is what I found.


Cheese nameRegion, countryWhen was it invented?
RicottaItalyBronze Age (2nd millennium BCE)
SalersAuvergne, FrancePossibly as early as 2000 years ago
Pecorino RomanoLazio, ItalyPossibly from the 1st century CE
SbrinzSwitzerland70 CE according to their website
BanonProvence, FranceAt least since 2nd century CE
MozzarellaSouth Italy5th or 12th century
ChabichouPoitou, France732
Brie De MeauxÎle-de-France774
Pecorino sardoSardinia, ItalyLate 8th century
GorgonzolaLombardy, Italy879
MunsterAlsace & Lorraine, France9th century
MaroillesPicardy, France962
FetaGreeceAt least since the 11th century
GoudaHolland, NetherlandsFirst recorded in 1184
CheddarSomerset, England12th century
Pont-l'ÉvêqueNormandy, France12th century
Parmigiano-ReggianoEmilia, ItalyFirst recorded in 1254
Emmental SwitzerlandFirst recorded in 1293
CantalAuvergne, FranceFirst recorded in 1298
AppenzellerSwitzerland13th century
EdamHolland, Netherlands14th century
HerveLiège, Belgium15th century
RocamadourOccitanie, France15th century
ÉpoissesBurgundy, France16th century
ReblochonSavoy, France16th century
CancoillotteFranche-Comté, Lorraine16th century
GruyèreSwitzerlandFirst recorded in 1655
Saint-nectaireAuvergne, France17th century
Tomme vaudoiseSwitzerland17th century
 
Very interesting Maciamo.

If I was to guess some kind of white cheese(akin to Feta but not limited to sheep/goat milk mixtures) has to be among the oldest, due to the nature and simplicity of production, no need for aging, and simple preservation in salt and water.

Did a little googling, and not sure about the reliability of source but here is an interesting list: https://www.oldest.org/food/cheese/

This video on cheese is also very informative, don't be fooled by the title, that cheese expert gives a lot of info on some of the most popular cheeses.

My personal favorites are hard cheeses Grana/Parmigiano, Alpine. And my absolute favorite Gorgonzola.

I suspect there have been much older cheeses than the ones on the list I provided in the link, but it was probably made by nomad herders in the steppes inside animal skins, hence no way to prove they even existed, the method of making/storing doesn't fare well the test of time.
 
I suspect there have been much older cheeses than the ones on the list I provided in the link, but it was probably made by nomad herders in the steppes inside animal skins, hence no way to prove they even existed, the method of making/storing doesn't fare well the test of time.
 
Parmigiano is the kind of Cheeses, imo, but I like many of them, even if most of them don't particularly like me if I eat too much of them: Grana Padana, fontina, bel paese, brie, camembert, munster, cheddar, gruyere, mozzarella, burrata, ricotta, mascarpone etc. I could go on and on.

I also like blue cheeses, but of them all I prefer Italian sweet gorgonzola. Just slathered on a slice of crusty, Italian bread and I'm in heaven. My mother also used to mix gorgonzola and ricotta, and stuff the mixture into celery stalks. Gorgonzola sauce is also wonderful on pasta.
 

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