Question How does a new Y-dna haplogroup appeared?

Moe

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Newbie here. How does a new Y-dna haplogroup generated? For example like how does Y-dna A become Y-dna B and so on? Clarifications, please.
 
Newbie here. How does a new Y-dna haplogroup generated? For example like how does Y-dna A become Y-dna B and so on? Clarifications, please.

You just need that 1 man has a genetic mutation in his Y-chromosome (there are mutations on all of the DNA at all time) and give it time and DESCENDANTS
 
You just need that 1 man has a genetic mutation in his Y-chromosome (there are mutations on all of the DNA at all time) and give it time and DESCENDANTS
So, is it possible for a man with Y-dna haplogroup J to have a biological son with a totally different Y-dna haplogroup like Y-dna haplogroup K or Q?
 
So, is it possible for a man with Y-dna haplogroup J to have a biological son with a totally different Y-dna haplogroup like Y-dna haplogroup K or Q?
As-Salam-Aleikum akhi. If a man is J1 his son would be under J1 and his subclade aswell. Sometimes there are new mutations but the father’s haplogroup would still be ancestral to his haplogroup. A man inherits 100% of the Y chromosome of his father.
 
As-Salam-Aleikum akhi. If a man is J1 his son would be under J1 and his subclade aswell. Sometimes there are new mutations but the father’s haplogroup would still be ancestral to his haplogroup. A man inherits 100% of the Y chromosome of his father.
Wa alaykumu salam, so his son's haplogroup is still assigned as J?
 
Wa alaykumu salam, so his son's haplogroup is still assigned as J?
Yes exactly. Not only he share the same J haplogroup but has the same subclades further down J
 
He could however develop a mutation ( during spermatogenesis ) which creates a new subclade, which will however will be classified under the same J haplogroup and all the same subclades further down all the way down to the father.
So yes, mutations do happen and some of them do create new subclades ( that have to spread to large population groups to be noticed though).
 
Newbie here. How does a new Y-dna haplogroup generated? For example like how does Y-dna A become Y-dna B and so on? Clarifications, please.
A new Y-dna haplogroup is generated by a mutation that occurs when a father passes on his Y chromosome to a son. Mutations of Y-dna occur about every three generations on average. Each mutation potentially creates a new Y-dna haplogroup if the son with the mutation has sons, grandsons and so on. It's like a new twig on the branch of a tree. The twig is new but it's still part of the same branch.

New haplogroups are being generated all the time. Not all recent haplogroups have been identified and named yet. When I had a Y chromosome test (FTDNA Big-700) it identified a new terminal haplogroup with just me and one other tester in it. Three years later 21 subsequent testers belong to this Y haplogroup in 12 descendant haplogroups that were previously unidentified.
 
You just need that 1 man has a genetic mutation in his Y-chromosome (there are mutations on all of the DNA at all time) and give it time and DESCENDANTS
The haplogroup defining mutation usually just happens in only ONE of the father's sperms? Or it usually occur in a whole population of sperm cells inside the father's testes that affects multiple sperms?
 
Yes exactly. Not only he share the same J haplogroup but has the same subclades further down J
Does the haplogroup defining mutation usually only occur in ONE of the father's sperm cells? So you can have two brothers in a family carrying two different Y haplogroups even if they are biological brothers both paternally and maternally in every way? For example, there was a man with haplogroup K2b who fathered the first man with haplogroups P on earth, but that P-F5850 mutation only affected a single particular sperm in his body, the other sperms he has are not gifted with this mutation, so even if he continues to have more sons they will all just be K2b, not P?
 
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He could however develop a mutation ( during spermatogenesis ) which creates a new subclade, which will however will be classified under the same J haplogroup and all the same subclades further down all the way down to the father.
So yes, mutations do happen and some of them do create new subclades ( that have to spread to large population groups to be noticed though).
The haplogroup defining mutation usually only occur in ONE of the father's sperm cells? So you can have two brothers in a family carrying two different Y haplogroups even if they are biological brothers both paternally and maternally in every way? For example, there was a man with haplogroup K2b who fathered the first man with haplogroups P on earth, but that P-F5850 mutation only affected a single particular sperm in his body, the other sperms he has are not gifted with this mutation, so even if he continues to have more sons they will all just be K2b, not P?
 

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