How do you feel about your country's education system ?

How do you feel about your countrys education system

I wont say we have a lot of homework but I find it hard to fit it in and I am the only one in the house that seems to think about it. My son is in grade 3 and in French Immersion, he has 20 mins of English reading every day and 1 small French book with a sheet he needs to fill out in French. It has about 6 sections in it. He also has a test every other week in math....which we are sent a note home in French on what to study I have to use google translate to know what it says. My daughter is in grade 1 and usually just has reading to do 3 times a week. We only do sports on Sats now but I feel like through the week it is hard to get homework done. I get home from work at 5:15, drive my after school sitter home and I am home to make supper. By the time supper is done and kitchen clean it is usually 6:45 and now we are looking at doing homework and it is a fight. My husband gets home at 7:30. I just feel like it is hard to get everything done. So I am just wondering.....how do you do it??
 
[FONT=&quot]More than 90% of students in the UK attend publicly-funded state schools. Approximately 8.5 million children attend one of the 30,000 schools in England and Wales; in Scotland, 830,000 children attend about 5,000 schools, including pre-schools and other special education schools; and Northern Ireland sends 350,000 children to 1,300 state schools. Primary schools usually include both girls and boys as pupils. Secondary schools may be either single-sex or co-educational. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]National curriculum core subjects – 5 to 11 year olds (Key stages 1 and 2): [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]English, Maths, Science, Design and technology, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), History, Geography, Art and design, Music, Physical education [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Schools also have to teach religious education and are encouraged to prove personal, social and health education (PSHE) and citizenship, and at least one modern foreign language. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]National curriculum core subjects – 11 to 14year olds (Key stage 3): [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]English, maths, Science, Design and technology, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), History, Geography, Modern foreign languages, Art and design, Music, Citizenship, Physical education.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Schools also have to provide: Careers education and guidance (during Year 9), Sex and Relationship Education (SRE), Religious education. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Throughout key stages 1-3 pupils are routinely tested in Standard Assessment Tests (SATs) but these are being phased out by the Government. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Key stage 4 – GCSE: [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]At GCSE level, students have to take English, maths, science, IT, citizenship and physical education. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]The GCSE is a single-subject examination set and marked by independent examination boards. Students usually take up to ten (there is no upper or lower limit) GCSE examinations in different subjects, including mathematics and English language. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]The Government is currently reviewing the national curriculum, exploring how to slim it down. The revised curriculum is expected to be taught in schools from September 2013. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]After taking GCSEs, students may leave secondary schooling; alternatively, they may choose to continue their education at vocational or technical colleges, or they may take a higher level of secondary school examinations known as AS-Levels after an additional year of study. Following two years of study, students may take A-Level (short for Advanced Level) examinations, which are required for university entrance in the UK. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The American concept of a school transcript is unfamiliar in the UK. Schools in the UK do not generally rank pupils within their year; currently, the principal standards are the GCSE, SCE and AS and A-Level examination results. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]There is no official method of equating British and American primary and secondary educational qualifications. The educational systems are entirely different and attempts to compare them must be done on a strictly provisional basis. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]For more information on English examinations, please visit the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, which is the largest of the three English examination bodies. For information on Northern Ireland’s examination policy, please visit the Council on Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment, or for more about Scotland’s grading procedures, you can review the Scottish Qualifications Authority’s website. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Post-secondary and Higher Education [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Approximately 1.8 million students are currently enrolled in the UK higher education system; about one third of young people go on to higher education at age 18 (with almost 50% of students in Scotland), and an increasing number of "mature" students are studying either full-time or part-time for university degrees website [/FONT]essayprepper.com [FONT=&quot]will help . [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Professional courses, such as medicine, veterinary medicine, law and teaching, usually are undertaken as five-year undergraduate degrees. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]To learn more about opportunities to study abroad or earn an undergraduate or graduate degree in the UK, please visit our Study in the UK page.[/FONT]
 
Every country has a different culture and language. In the same way, the education system is also different all over the world. The American education system is not up to the mark. There are many error or issues are growing day by day, need to fix it.
 
In the US, the Department of Education doesn’t run Schools and Colleges.

There isn't :unsure: there’s not much of a Standardized Federal Education System.

The States decide how to run their schools, the curricula (curriculums :) , what books to use, ...

imo complaints and criticism should be addressed and limited to the single State in question.
 
My country's education system is not good so far some fault in the education system.
I think these faults recover as soon as possible.
 
In the U.S., the educational system varies from state to state.

I'm from Florida. I can't speak for the education systems in other states, but our curriculum was lacking.
 
Well, i can't say much about our ed. system. Because you, guys, have already said almost my thoughts. I have a friend in East EU. He said that their ed. system is trash. They learning from books which were written in 80-90. And its not happened in school. In colleges too. Can you imagine?
 
Since we have state run schools, the states decide how to allot the money to the school districts. In Illinois, larger communities receive larger per capita from the state. For instance in Chicago schools, the schools receive $15 per capita, in Madison County, south central Illinois, the amount is $1.50 per student. Very unfair even though Madison County property tax rates are at a much higher rate than Chicago.
 
In this modern age, you don’t need high-tech bombs to destroy a country. Just corrupt or destroy their education system and that country will fall apart in a very few time. These words clarify the importance of the education system for a country. Many countries are full of natural resources which can make them one of the richest countries but just because of the lack of education they are struggling. To make a country strong or successful first thing to do is improve the education system of that country. Because a country can’t survive if the people of that country don’t know how to survive.
As a teacher, you can also help to create your country great by using the Complete List of Teaching Methods and Strategies: mytutorsource.com/blog/teaching-methods/
To improve the education system of a developing country there are a few basic things we should work on. First of all, we have to improve the standard of our education. While making the programs and policies keep the higher aims and goals in mind. Next is accountability which is one of the most essential parts of the education system. There must be an accountability framework in place that rewards institutions that achieve exceptional achievements while penalizing those that do not. Also, involve the parents of the students. Just a teacher can’t do anything without parents' help. Because in the school the teacher has responsibility for students study but at the same time parents also have to play their role to teach their children’s. The final step which is essential to improve a country’s education system is to stay up to date with the technology. If you are living in 2022 and still teaching windows XP or dos to the students then you are just destroying the student’s future.
Absolutely agree.
 
I have expressed my concerns about the Japanese education system before... and I still feel like discussing it as there are high probablities that my future child(ren) will be born in Japan, and possibly also educated there.
Among the most negative aspects of the Japanese education system are :
1) too based on memory, and almost complete lack of critical analysis and debate.
2) no choice of other foreign language than English before university
3) very poor English teachers (often they couldn't hold a conversation with a native speaker)
4) teachers lack professional knowledge. One secondary school teacher can teach several unrelated subjects (eg. maths, history and English), which is unheard of where I come from.
5) too uniformised curriculum. Teachers have no freedom to choose their textbook or create their own syllabus, or to choose what part of the curriculum should be more emphasized.
6) low level of education in general (eg. now students learn that the circular constant (pi) is 3 instead of 3,1415; students can speak English when they complete highschool;...)
7) poor general knowledge curriculum (little history and geography)

Look at Japan's performance in OECD PISA. Their results are leading in Mathematics and Science, and above the OECD average in Reading in 2018.

The results for PISA in the first one (2000) were underwhelming for Japan and led to commentary that the country had little free thought and complex analysis, and mostly rote repetition (see 1) from Maciamo above). The education system changed and Japan has done better in the test as a possible result.

Note, the test is in Japanese. The English language teaching is absolute crap in Japan (3).
 
From a 2009 paper
Parents in Japan are better educated than those in most other countries...
The share of students from disadvantaged backgrounds in Japan is below average...
Among OECD countries, Japan has the 3rd smallest proportion of students with an immigrant background.
Low spending on education but good results
Japan ranks 17th among 34 OECD countries on GDP per capita ...
Results from PISA suggest that Japan’s education system has produced strong results despite the fact that total spending on education,
both public and private is well below the OECD average as a share of GDP. Japan invests 3.3% of its GDP in education, compared

to the OECD average of 4.9%, representing 9.4% of overall public expenditure, compared to an OECD average of 13.3%
About juku classes
A large percentage of Japanese students receive private, out-of-school academic instruction. Such instruction often takes place in institutions known as “juku”, but is also delivered as home-based tutoring and distance learning. At the primary school level,jukuparticipation increased from 16% in 1985 to 26% in 2007, and at the lower secondary level, from 44% to 53%. At the upper secondary level, participation in private tutoring is even greater... The average expenditure [on Juku] per student more than doubled in real terms between 1985 and 2007, reaching an average of JPY 21 000 per month (about USD 3 150 annually)
preschool
Attendance in more than one year of pre-primary education was practically universal (97%) in Japan
 
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In this modern age, you don’t need high-tech bombs to destroy a country. Just corrupt or destroy their education system and that country will fall apart in a very few time. These words clarify the importance of the education system for a country. Many countries are full of natural resources which can make them one of the richest countries but just because of the lack of education they are struggling. To make a country strong or successful first thing to do is improve the education system of that country. Because a country can’t survive if the people of that country don’t know how to survive.
As a teacher, you can also help to create your country great by using the Complete List of Teaching Methods and Strategies: mytutorsource.com/blog/teaching-methods/
To improve the education system of a developing country there are a few basic things we should work on. First of all, we have to improve the standard of our education. While making the programs and policies keep the higher aims and goals in mind. Next is accountability which is one of the most essential parts of the education system. There must be an accountability framework in place that rewards institutions that achieve exceptional achievements while penalizing those that do not. Also, optimization is needed because students spend too much time on homework and face a lot of stress. For example, the last paper I needed to write took me a few days, and I was just lucky to find site over here with army values essay samples which helped me a lot and saved from missing the deadline. And such tasks I have a lot of every day. Also, involve the parents of the students. Just a teacher can’t do anything without parents' help. Because in the school the teacher has responsibility for students study but at the same time parents also have to play their role to teach their children’s. The final step which is essential to improve a country’s education system is to stay up to date with the technology. If you are living in 2022 and still teaching windows XP or dos to the students then you are just destroying the student’s future.

I agree with you. The country is defined by people, and if the people are not educated, then everything will be destroyed. And I think that each country should make the educational system one of its priorities because it's important to develop and improve it. The educational system in my country is not perfect, it has a lot of things which are needed to be changed, but those changes are happening. And I hope that in the future the situation will be much better.
 

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