Haplogroups Bolivia

Mmiikkii

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On the main page of Eupedia, Maciamo wrote an article called "The European colonization and the spread of languages". In it, Maciamo proposes that miscegenation was a fundamental factor in the diffusion of European languages ​​throughout the world, and that the lack of it explains the loss of those languages ​​despite the long time of colonization (for example, Spanish was the language of the Philippines for 300 years, and disappeared in a few decades when the islands came under the control of the United States). It is conceivable that, for a pure indigenous in colonial times, Spanish was the language of the rulers, which had to be learned by obligation, while at home he spoke the indigenous language. In the house of a mestizo, on the other hand, Spanish was the mother tongue (although they could also be bilingual). This may explain why Spanish (and Portuguese) was not lost in Latin America after breaking the bond that united it to the European metropolises.
 
Would have been nice if they had a bolivian ftdna group to see more indepth haplogroup results.
 
On the main page of Eupedia, Maciamo wrote an article called "The European colonization and the spread of languages". In it, Maciamo proposes that miscegenation was a fundamental factor in the diffusion of European languages ​​throughout the world, and that the lack of it explains the loss of those languages ​​despite the long time of colonization (for example, Spanish was the language of the Philippines for 300 years, and disappeared in a few decades when the islands came under the control of the United States)

Yes, it's difficult that one is going to change one's language if there's no a substantial population influx.

Sure, the local elites can learn it, but it's likely that when that elite is removed, a lot have not being out of their villages and education has barely affected them, so they keep speaking the original tongue.
 

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