Haplogroup W - Do I even exist?

I don't know, in terms of frequencies the highest percentages are the above mentioned ones, they probably arrived from there towards the Finland high area so I'm assuming either it originated in the Middle East towards Iran or in the Indus Valley bordering India/Pakistan I guess; frequency does not mean origin point only population in which it is most present so with regards to thT I have no more information, so I don't know.
 
I would suspect the Finland region to have a young clade and diversity of W whereas the middle eastern Iranian or Indian/Pakistan whatever samples have more diverse older "W1" type subclades.
 
Personally, in Europe, I have found mtdna X and W lineages to rise in southern Mediterranean/Aegean Europe, mtdna J has a European high in Greece for example of 15%; HV must also be slightly more frequent in these regions.
 
My wife is W1, with a maternal line that traces back to the British Isles. 23 and me is now on the page that mt-DNA haplogroup W has an Indo-European origin now. Here is the snippet from her ancestry report:

"The name of the Corded Ware culture comes from their characteristic pottery, which was decorated with cord-like designs. The people of the Corded Ware culture likely grew out of the steppe culture north of the Caspian Sea approximately 4,900 years ago, and were highly mobile and used horses and wagons extensively. They spread west to cover much of central and eastern Europe from the Volga to Germany and the coast of the Baltic Sea, spreading proto-Indo-European language with them. In fact, their language was the common prehistoric ancestor of Celtic, German, Baltic and Slavic languages.
While the expansions of horseback warriors from the steppes are associated most strongly with the spread of paternal lineages, a number of maternal lineages also grew in frequency with the spread of the Corded Ware culture from the east. Researchers have found members of haplogroup W in remains from both the steppes and Corded Ware sites, suggesting that W may have been one of these maternal lineages."
 
Hello! Just learned I am W1, but fit no currently defined subgroup. My mother's family is from Norway, and likely Finland. Looking forward to hearing from more W1's. :)
 
I am also a W1, no specified subgroup. My family is mostly from Scotland, with a dash of Irish and English, at least as far back as I have been able to trace in records. A lot of them were from the outer Hebrides, going back a long way. Ancestry and other atDNA testing sites have estimated my ethnicity as almost entirely UK (Scottish and Irish), with traces of Scandinavian. Which makes sense as the north coast of Scotland and the Hebrides were under the control of Norse kings from time to time throughout history. I have some mutations which are apparently unusual enough to not get mentioned in any of the research I have seen so far: C195T, 309.1C, 315.1C, 522.1A, and 522.2C. However, it can't be that unusual, as I have 11 exact matches on FTDNA. Do we have any mutations in common? Did you find you have a lot of exact matches?

As an aside, it just occurred to me how bizarre this conversation would seem to many people I know, as we sit here comparing our mutations...:rolleyes:
 
My daughter (and her mother) has W.

This is the explanation of 23andMe;

Haplogroup W has been found at sites from the Corded Ware Culture.


The name of the Corded Ware culture comes from their characteristic pottery, which was decorated with cord-like designs. The people of the Corded Ware culture likely grew out of the steppe culture north of the Caspian Sea approximately 4,900 years ago, and were highly mobile and used horses and wagons extensively. They spread west to cover much of central and eastern Europe from the Volga to Germany and the coast of the Baltic Sea, spreading proto-Indo-European language with them. In fact, their language was the common prehistoric ancestor of Celtic, German, Baltic and Slavic languages.
While the expansions of horseback warriors from the steppes are associated most strongly with the spread of paternal lineages, a number of maternal lineages also grew in frequency with the spread of the Corded Ware culture from the east. Researchers have found members of haplogroup W in remains from both the steppes and Corded Ware sites, suggesting that W may have been one of these maternal lineages.
 
I am also a W1, no specified subgroup. My family is mostly from Scotland, with a dash of Irish and English, at least as far back as I have been able to trace in records. A lot of them were from the outer Hebrides, going back a long way. Ancestry and other atDNA testing sites have estimated my ethnicity as almost entirely UK (Scottish and Irish), with traces of Scandinavian. Which makes sense as the north coast of Scotland and the Hebrides were under the control of Norse kings from time to time throughout history. I have some mutations which are apparently unusual enough to not get mentioned in any of the research I have seen so far: C195T, 309.1C, 315.1C, 522.1A, and 522.2C. However, it can't be that unusual, as I have 11 exact matches on FTDNA. Do we have any mutations in common? Did you find you have a lot of exact matches?

As an aside, it just occurred to me how bizarre this conversation would seem to many people I know, as we sit here comparing our mutations...:rolleyes:
I recently Tested my mother as W! and am an exact match with you I am B459705 and and listed with W1-C195T
 
My mother's family immigrated from Germany in between the world wars. My grandmother on my mother's side was apparently Polish or Czech, it's been a bit vague. My 23&me DNA testing indicates a fairly recent ancestry/relatives in Hungary and Russia, so I'm thinking my grandparents on my mother's side were Eastern Europeans heading further west every few generations. One service claims W1c for me, but most others return the more generic W1, and one third-party tool suggests W1i. I have decided to get a more complete analysis done because I am too curious to let this remain so vague.

I'm not an expert, but seems that W spread a lot around the Mediterranean Sea along with land migrations north and west, but sometimes south and west, like, doubling back through Anatolia, before mostly absorbing into central Europe from the south. It's been a bit of an adventure learning about the various possible migratory waves and the scale of the spread of subclades of W. I seem to have distant relatives as far east as Pakistan, which I think is amazingly cool.
 

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