New map of Haplogrpoup R1 (R1a + R1b)

Maciamo

Veteran member
Admin
Messages
10,115
Reaction score
3,561
Points
113
Location
Lothier
Ethnic group
Italo-celto-germanic
After the map of Haplogroup I, here is the map of Haplogroup R1.

Since both R1a and R1b are associated with the spread of Indo-European languages, it is easy to visualise why almost all Europeans speak IE languages, but North Africans and Middle Easterners don't (apart from the Armenians, who have 35% of R1).

The Finns and the Sami are also clear outliers on the map. The Estonians, who speak an Uralic language like the Finns and Sami, have 40% of R1, but that is because ethnic Estonians make up less than 60% of the population. The remainder are mostly Russians (33%), with various Slavic and Germanic minorities. Ethnic Estonians are otherwise similar to the Finns in their low percentage of hg R1.

Other outliers are the Sardinians, who were the last southern Europeans to adopt an Indo-European language, as late as 2000 years ago (that is approximately 2000 to 3000 years after other Europeans).

I wouldn't be surprised if the Illyrians, the earliest recorded IE speakers in formers Yugoslavia, only reached Bosnia and southern Croatia during the Iron Age. That would explain why the region retained so many pre-IE lineages (unless of course I2a1 came with the IE invaders).

Anatolia used to be partially Indo-European-speaking during the Bronze and Iron Ages, and essentially Greek-speaking during most of the Middle Ages. In those ages, the proportion of haplogroup R1 would have been higher. Turkish and Arabic invaders have lowered its frequency to around 23% today. I expect that the total of R1a and R1b would have exceeded 35% of lineages in ancient times. Central and East Asian haplogroups (C, N, O, Q) alone represent some 10% of Anatolian lineages nowadays.

The Basques and the Hungarians are the only non-IE-speakers with a high percentage of R1. I have explained how this came to be for the Basques here. The Hungarians have a lot of R1a of Central Asian origin, which probably underwent the same language shift as Turkic languages.

Haplogroup_R-borders.gif
 
Last edited:
Maciamo, is there enough data for a DF27 map yet?
 
Thank you for another great map Maciamo. You could charge money for these, but I'm glad you don't... :)
 
Maciamo, is there enough data for a DF27 map yet?

Nope, not enough data. DF27 and most of its subclades (aside fro M153 and SRY2627) are too new and were not part of any major studies so far. There isn't even an FTDNA project for DF27 yet.
 
Nope, not enough data. DF27 and most of its subclades (aside fro M153 and SRY2627) are too new and were not part of any major studies so far. There isn't even an FTDNA project for DF27 yet.

It is true there is no DF27 specific project, but the P312 project has switched focus to DF27, DF19 to go along with the dwindling P312* and small L238 groups. The project administrator is DF27.
 
I2a in Yugoslavia is too young to be associated with PIE inhabitants of Western Balkans and Illyrian invaders from Central Europe. It is probably a East European marker Geto-Dacian, Slavic and such and significantly increased in Balkans with the Slavic invasions. You should not forget the highest diversity of I2a1b is in Northern Romania and Ukraine border. And this subclade is related to the Yugoslavian ones which lack diversity.
 
I2a in Yugoslavia is too young to be associated with PIE inhabitants of Western Balkans and Illyrian invaders from Central Europe. It is probably a East European marker Geto-Dacian, Slavic and such and significantly increased in Balkans with the Slavic invasions. You should not forget the highest diversity of I2a1b is in Northern Romania and Ukraine border. And this subclade is related to the Yugoslavian ones which lack diversity.
Is there any Geto-Dacian or Slavic aDNA supporting your statement?What means "Yugoslavia"?
 

This thread has been viewed 12943 times.

Back
Top