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    Nobody’s land? The oldest evidence of early Upper Paleolithic settlements in inland Iberia

    The Iberian Peninsula is a key region for unraveling human settlement histories of Eurasia during the period spanning the decline of Neandertals and the emergence of anatomically modern humans (AMH). There is no evidence of human occupation in central Iberia after the disappearance of...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Ancient ANE admixture in Iberia, according to the tables in the Carlos Quiles Indoeuropean site. with relevant percent: I8130,Y-hg CT, ANE 11.2%, 6007 BC (see genetic relatedness in the previous figure) I7597, Y-hg CT, ANE 29%, 3675 BC ATP3, Y-hg R-M269?, ANE 12.77%, 3447 BC ATP7, female, ANE...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Yes, this is the eastward expansion from the southeastern Europe. Furthermore, the present article reports in Iberia a gene flow related to HGs from the Balkans to around 8200 BP. Genetic contact from Caucasus and steppe region is much earlier than the 3th millennium and also in a territory...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    In the paper we can read: By contrast, later individuals from northern Iberia were more similar to HGs from southeastern Europe, deriving around 30–40% of their ancestry from a source related to HGs from the Balkans in more proximate models ... The earliest evidence for this gene flow was...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Thank you for your response, bicicleur. Therefore, we can evaluate these results with two hypothesis, 1. ATP3 is not R-M269 and 2. ATP3 is R-M269, went far astray. With respect to the link, it was in the post of Olympus Mons which I cited. This is the Genetiker link stating ATP3 is R1b1a1a2-M269...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Olympus Mons wrote in the thread Iberian Neolithic M269?: It just has been published … by Sergey Malyshev. (https://kumbarov.com/ht35/R1b_xP312xU106_V.38.1.pdf) I don’t really know them, don’t know how credible this things are. However two things are remarkable. a. They, like Genetiker, put...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Thank you for your comment, bicycleur 2. I am assuming the Genetiker result of R-M269 for ATP3 in Atapuerca. Is not valid that information?
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    These results are consistent with the emergence of R-P312 individuals in -2673 to -2300 BC, Late Chalcolithic/Bronze Age, in central-west Europe.
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    According to the genetic relatedness during -5000 to -3000 BC, Europe is divided again in two zones. If we plot the R-M269 individuals, the most ancient individual is I2181 in Bulgaria (-4508 BC) with 26% of ANE admixture, which can be considered in the central-west Europe zone by proximity. The...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    When we add the most ancient R-P297* individual, I4630 in Latvia (-7268 BC), we observe that it is included in a larger relatedness zone (-7000 to -5000 BC, approx.) extending to all Europe. There is another more recent R-P297 individual in this zone and another one in an Asiatic zone with less...
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Joining the y-adn data of R1b individuals with this genetic relatedness is very illustrative, as you can see in the figure. The most ancient R-L754 data are Villabruna in Italy (-12071 BC), VLASA32 in Serbia (-7655 BC) and I4081 in Romania (-7411 BC). All individuals can be considered enclosed...
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    Phenotypes of the Spaniards

    Thank you for your post. I agree with you about the J Roman patrilineage. In my own case, for example, I possibly descend of a legionary in NW Hispania. The quote is of a Maciamo's post in another thread. To my (limited) knowledge, it is a good resume of our (Spanish) ancestry in terms of...
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    Phenotypes of the Spaniards

    Phenotypes of the Spaniards There are no surprise. All is as it can be expected if we read a Maciamo's post in another thread, which I completely agree and repeat here. "Yet Spaniards aren't that much of Roman descent." Many people believe that Spanish are Roman descent, but it is not so much...
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    Neolithic navigation

    Farming communities were no simple. In fact, they can be associated not only to agricultural and navigation skills but also to the Megalithic culture (see, for example the Maciamo's thread https://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/new-map-of-the-megalithic-cultures.40082/). Notice that the Early...
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    Neolithic navigation

    (source: wikipedia) The first alleged circumnavigation of the African continent attested to was made by Phoenician sailors, in an expedition commissioned by Egyptian pharaoh Necho II, c. 600 BC which took three years. A report of this expedition is provided by Herodotus (4.37). They sailed...
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    Neolithic navigation

    This paper gives me the opportunity to express the idea that navigation is a human invention very very undervalued and, in my opinion, most important than the wheel. If someone is interested in this topic, it would be interesting to share some comments about this topic. In the Neolithic, when...
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    Neolithic navigation

    The first Neolithic boats in the Mediterranean: The settlement of La Marmotta (Anguillara Sabazia, Lazio, Italy) Abstract Navigation in the Mediterranean in the Neolithic is studied here through the boats that were used, the degree of technical specialisation in their construction and, above...
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    Violence trends in the ancient Middle East between 12,000 and 400 BCE

    More violence (Neolithic): https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-023-43026-9 Large‐scale violence in Late Neolithic Western Europe based on expanded skeletal evidence from San Juan ante Portam Latinam This paper explores the nature and extent of conflict in Late Neolithic Europe based on...
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    Violence trends in the ancient Middle East between 12,000 and 400 BCE

    I don't remember DNA results. Also, the violence peaked around 4000 BCE, suggesting anatolian farmers DNA, and around 2500 BCE, DNA of bronze and iron weapons people. Perhaps we agree that violence is a sapiens DNA attribute. :(
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    Violence trends in the ancient Middle East between 12,000 and 400 BCE

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-023-01700-y.epdf?sharing_token=DlR59Q8vFCPz1Iq8TeCIS9RgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0OKyAVMuIKVUu3CqPi6YyliV65jqorO1bDGAhBUmJDIZRikRAK_fmj-g5EpHmBbZoB0IzPfBS0U_UdgsvwjJHtO3rB8XfMgzOzRmCQguNo_EZvB0EBXi7PtWtWIIVGg_N3iN9uZzTRbo21iLaMo_5Gm8tH3EO-THtWLLVfr4Av01g%3D%3D&tracki...
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