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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    We know from the abstract about the large sample of the Transylvanian "Scythians" that these were highly mixed, with a strong local element, which had a more Balkan-like autosomal profile. The local element became ever more dominant over time, and continued to dominate in the subsequent La Tene...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    We can expect that combination to appear in the Transtisza zone. Probably the mtDNA even before the rise of E-V13 if the pattern being consistent. On the Merovingian samples: FTDNA assigned the Sint-Truiden 58 sample to E-V13 as well, to be exact to E-CTS5856. Koksijde 11 remained just E-V13...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    The change was quite fundamental going by yDNA: R-M269 and E-V13 appear with Christian settlers. Also in the mtDNA, though less clear cut: The background of the Christian population is ill-defined by their analysis: Probably a very specific mix or unknown source group? I hope the R1b can...
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    Question Inbreeding and DNA results

    The video is quite educational, but they wrong on Ancestry's Timber algorithm, because it doesn't work well. It reduces and completely deletes matches which are real and vice versa. It sometimes works just fine, but due to reducing or even sorting out real, valuable matches, it causes more...
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    MyHeritage vs (Recent Update)

    Too much smoothing, therefore people with 4/4 ancestry usually get more accurate results, people with mixed ancestries or with suboptimal references get more often erroneous results than before.
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    I think so too, but keep in mind how populous groups like Suciu de Sus were. Compared to the scattered huts and caves in most of Southern Thrace, they were a demographic powerhouse and they largely moved out, at the end of the Bronze Age. A good question is whether this was primarily a knock on...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    There are two steppe influences in Transylvania, one being the early, related to Usatovo and Cernovada, constituting the shift from earlier Copper Age groups to Cotofeni, and the latter being with Yamnaya. But at the time of Yamnaya, we already have an established Cotofeni population, which just...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    That's quite interesting. I went for the most specific haplogroups first and came across these: 1. https://www.yfull.com/mtree/H1e1b1/ The dating seems to be a bit off, but its interesting where this haplogroup pops up: - Post-Psenichevo (BGR_IA) Thracians - Avar-Early Hungarian - Albanians...
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    Pcinja Culture group - possible source for R-Z2705?

    To associate the haplogroup with the Paeonians is also my favourite hypothesis. Concerning the differentiation of Thracians vs. Paeonians, this is a difficult task, since the available evidence is sparse. The Agrianians for example being sometimes considered Paeonians, sometimes Thracian. We...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    We find the same in Nyirseg, Suciu de Sus, Lapus, Verbicoara, Tei, Fundeni-Govora, Gáva-Holigrady, Babadag, Psenichevo, Insula Banului, Sanislau-Nir group of Vekerzug, later Dacians. So basically a continuous tradition around the Upper Tisza and Olt rivers in particuliar from post-Cotofeni, the...
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    Mexican E-M35*

    Probably he got a more downstream assignment.
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    Indeed, the E-V13 phylogeny derived from moderns and the demographic evolution deducable from it are key parts of my argument altogether. E-V13 was probably 2-3 times larger than J-L283, rather more than less, in the MBA-EIA period. This means that E-V13 today is still a major haplogroup in...
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    Genetic study Geographic origin, ancestry, and death circumstances at the Cornaux/Les Sauges Iron Age bridge, Switzerland

    I'm aware of the "New Archaeology" dogma of cultural diffusion and "pots not people". I had discussion on the issue with my professor back then and I remember very well how they argued that "Bell Beakers are just a cultural phenomenon" and all that crap, even when we knew they were spreading not...
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    Genetic study Geographic origin, ancestry, and death circumstances at the Cornaux/Les Sauges Iron Age bridge, Switzerland

    If looking at cultureal groupings like Bell Beakers and Tumulus culture, we clearly see an ethnic group in the archaeological record, but the situation is more obvious in the core zone, the groups with the typical package. Especially at the fringes we get more kind of a variation and regional...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    The burnished ware is basically just Channelled/Knobbed Ware, essentially the same Gáva-related ceramic repertoire for fine ware. The black burnished surface resembled metal - clearly a sign for the association with metals and probably rituals, gods of the metals. Just like some ceramic bowls...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    I also want to add and stress one more time how important the samples from Viminacium are, for a variety of reasons: 1) They prove that cremation being associated with E-V13 like with no other Carpatho-Balkan haplogroup. In Viminacium we see a transition of the local population to inhumation in...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    Concerning the Slavic invasion and replacement events, I'm pretty sure that we deal with different Slavic tribes, of which some might have mixed more extensively with Central-SEE groups, including those rich in E-V13, wheras others did much less so. Therefore we might deal with Slavic tribes...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    Especially in the Carpatho-Balkan sphere of the Iron Age and Roman period, the primary group which most consistently used cremation were North Thracians/Dacians. In fact, that's their signature rite. These specific results from Jagodnjak relate to this publication and comment...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    There is another argument for him being authentic, his skull was below beams and elements of the bridge (table S14), just like that of most, but not all the other remains. That makes especially a later timing highly unlikely. The main issue for this sample was definitely the contamination. Also...
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    Neolithic Refuge and Continuity in Transylvania

    Bruzmi stresses the Roman era origin for most of J-L283 out of the Balkans as well. Even though its absolutely clear that some branches were early on adopted by Etruscans and Hallstatt people (I don't say Celts, because not all must have been Celts, even if they were Italo-Celtic/Centum IE...
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