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    Villanovan, Etruscan, Tarquinian & Latin DNA

    Ind 11 is an exception - a female with Nordic ancestry who had grown up somewhere else. All were people that had done physical labour, seen violence or even died violently, buried in a sacred place at a time when most were burned and with the graves marked…
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    Population genomics of post-glacial western Eurasia

    Maps showing networks of highest IBD sharing (top 10 highest sharing per individual) during different time periods for 579 imputed genomes predating 3,000 cal. BP and located in the geographical region shown. Shading and thickness of lines are scaled to represent the amount of IBD shared between...
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    100 ancient genomes show repeated population turnovers in Neolithic Denmark

    Abstract Major migration events in Holocene Eurasia have been characterized genetically at broad regional scales1,2,3,4. However, insights into the population dynamics in the contact zones are hampered by a lack of ancient genomic data sampled at high spatiotemporal resolution5,6,7. Here, to...
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    Trumpington burial: Teenage Anglo-Saxon girl's face revealed

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-65919518 The face of a girl who died more than 1,300 years ago has been revealed through facial reconstruction. Her skeleton was found buried on a wooden bed, with a gold and garnet cross on her chest at Trumpington, Cambridgeshire, in 2012.
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    Phylogeographic history of mitochondrial haplogroup J in Scandinavia

    J1c dominates across Europe. The clustering here suggests multiple waves of J migrations from different directions. Note Eastern/Western Europe is clustered separately from Central and Mediterranean J is most similar to Asian.
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    Long-term trends in human body size track regional variation in subsistence transitio

    The way the authors described LP spread, makes you think there were times when only milk drinkers survived. Milk is also a fluid source, useful when drinking water is not available or is contaminated. The more processed the product becomes, the more water it tends to lose. I guess this explains...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    Here is a map of contemporaneous sites with similar features, from https://www.dainst.blog/the-tepe-telegrams/2016/05/08/the-current-distribution-of-sites-with-t-shaped-pillars/.
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    It seems there are only a few pillars with many animals, two feature very prominently and P43 (below) specifically has captured the imagination of many amateur researchers. It also shows how the pillars have been relocated, as part of the image is inside a wall. Others are much simpler...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    The above image is not from GT, I presume? The GT enclosures interestingly each have a dominating species. In Enclosure A snakes are the dominating species, in Enclosure B foxes are frequent, in Enclosure C many boars are represented, while Enclosure D is more varied, with birds playing an...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    Cereals were mostly consumed as a porridge when pottery became available, not sure about pre-pottery times. Lots of grinding stones were found at GT. These were the tubs found: See...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    This is what the current project coordinator thinks about the temple idea: ”Turning to the interpretation of the site, I have always stressed that the proposed function of Göbeklitepe as a “temple” is highly problematic. As it stands, this term would presuppose, for example, the existence of...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    The big structures are dated PPNA and built directiy on bedrock, there is nothing underneath. Likewise for some smaller buildings, which do have later building phases as well. The whole site is only partially excavated, though.
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    Well, it is sometimes hard to forbid natural events. Apparently the location has heavy rains in the winter, as well as earthquakes (today’s two earthquakes were in the same mountain range). The terrain is very uneven. The big buildings were built in depressions, with rubble slopes surrounding...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    11A second but no less serious insight from recent studies relates to the fill of the special buildings in the low-lying southeastern part of the site (main excavation area). While previous conclusions postulated an intentional (ritually-motivated) backfilling of these structures at the close of...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    The first article offers an explanation that the filling was the result of a landslide :(
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Orhan-Ayaz-2/publication/366307611_Rise_of_Gobekli_Tepe_Culture_Hunting_Ground_Economy_and_the_Role_of_Speculative_Knowledge/links/63a99ed0097c7832ca6a302c/Rise-of-Goebekli-Tepe-Culture-Hunting-Ground-Economy-and-the-Role-of-Speculative-Knowledge.pdf RISE OF...
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    Göbekli Tepe, A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

    https://lens.idai.world/?url=/repository/eDAI-F_2020-2/eDAI-F_Clare.xml Göbekli Tepe (~9.500–8.000 calBC) is a prehistoric site in Southeast Turkey that dates back to an early stage in the transition from hunter-gathering to farming economies in the Near East. Research undertaken in the period...
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    Genetic study Studying genetic and cultural admixture of Phoenicians in Sicily

    There were a substantial number of North Africans at every site, including the Levant. This could mean they were an integral part of the Phoenician network, much more so than Europeans and Levantines (some Levantines discovered at both Sardinia and Sicily, though, and there are many people that...
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