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    New Felsina Etruscan Paper by Zaro et alia 2024

    Did the Greeks not actually see the Trojans as some sort of Greek?
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    New Felsina Etruscan Paper by Zaro et alia 2024

    Warlike tribes didn't stop the Greeks from setting up colonies/ city states in Southern Italy, Sicily and southern Gaul (Massilia,etc)
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    New Felsina Etruscan Paper by Zaro et alia 2024

    The ancestors of the Etruscans did not come from the area of Iran. As an ethnic group, Iron Age Etruscans were, in the main, a blend of Copper Age Italians (the majority) with Steppe-like incomers, probably Beaker folk.
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    New Felsina Etruscan Paper by Zaro et alia 2024

    Why do they refer to sample CAS054 as SubSaharan when figure 6.15 shows that this sample from Casalecchio is over 80pc Anatolian Neolithic+Yamnaya_Samara (no WHG) with under 20pc Moroccan Early Neolithic. Only the mtDNA is typically SubSaharan but also found in North Africa.
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    New Felsina Etruscan Paper by Zaro et alia 2024

    The link is: https://repository.unipr.it/bitstream/1889/5272/8/Tesi_dottorato_ZaroValentina.pdf
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    The new Felsina Etruscan paper is out! Link: https://repository.unipr.it/bitstream/1889/5272/8/Tesi_dottorato_ZaroValentina.pdf
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    I have ITTQ14 99.8 ITTQ8 0.2 @4.1161282 My number one isITTQ14 @4.1161%
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    The supplementary material suggests a general resemblance to North Italian (Parma) sample I1979 but with a little more Steppe. An exception....Individual 11 seems to be genetically North European.
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    Religious belief choice

    I was asked the same thing!
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    If you are referring to the Picene paper, I think those particular Etruscans came from further north, around Colle Val D'Elsa, I believe, not Tarquinia/Civitavecchia/Veii. Maybe there were local differences in colouring or else some sampling issue.
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    The Etruscans are nearly all Intermediate in skin tone with a few Pale-Intermediate while the Latins are mostly Intermediate or Dark. Etruscan hair and eye colour is also lighter than the Latin equivalent.
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    I can't say. I presume it represents a Levantine minority among Iron Age Etruscans. BTW, it did say "Levent" instead of the proper spelling "Levant"!
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    Was J2b not unusual in Etruscans. Posth's samples were mainly R1b.
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    Etruscan DNA: Tarquinia, ninth–seventh century BC, central Italy

    Tarquinia IA is my closest G25 ancient match @1.85 (Genoplot CheckFit) @ 0.01578187 I have: 78.4 Italy_TarquiniaMonterozzi_IA.SG 21.0 Italy_TarquiniaMonterozzi_IA_oLevent.SG 0.6 Morocco_Iberomaurusian
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    Photo-real portraits of Roman emperors

    The last representation of Julius Caesar in post 186 above is ridiculous with its unnaturally swollen head.
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    Photo-real portraits of Roman emperors

    Suetonius described Augustus as being "subflavus", not quite blonde, so perhaps some hair shade of auburn or medium brown, and with a skin complexion between fair and swarthy. His eyes were described as "bright" with no mention of an actual colour.
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    Phenotypes of the Portuguese

    Well, the photographs in Post no. 1 don't look any darker than other South Europeans or even Southern French.
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    Genetic study Population changes in northern Italy from the Iron Age to Modern Times

    We need to take into account that the Longobards were not really an ethnic group on the move but a collection of foederati loyal or disloyal to the Eastern Roman Empire at different times according to expediency and mostly male and polyethnic. Their Germanic language was largely replaced by...
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    Genetic study Population changes in northern Italy from the Iron Age to Modern Times

    OK. I'll bite. Can you explain your figures a bit more fully or is this all an educated guess?
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    Genetic study Population changes in northern Italy from the Iron Age to Modern Times

    Giacomo Devoto in his book "Gli Antichi Italici" considered the Osco-Umbrian and Latin-Faliscan linguistic groups to be originally distinct and separate branches of IE which converged to a certain, somewhat minor, degree within Italy itself. Devoto confined the term "Italic" to the Osco-Umbrian...
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